The Local Area

Hardwick House cottages are ideally positioned for visiting the many heritage landscape and coastal attractions nearby. With the huge success of Visit Yorkshire campaigns, visitors from all over the world are beginning to discover and enjoy what Yorkshire has to offer.

 

With this in mind, it is no coincidence that Nature Tourism is on the crest of a wave in the county with the Yorkshire Nature Triangle offering a diverse range of amenities, events and education for everyone to enjoy. Yorkshire Wildlife Trust actively promotes wildlife and nature across the county and Hardwick is situated close enough to visit them all. The Living Sea Centre at Flamborough and The Sea Bird Heritage Centre at Bempton are forging a fantastic future for Yorkshire nature and are only a short drive away from Hardwick House.

 

From the entire Yorkshire coast that hosts the only on-land bird colony in the UK to the rolling majesty of Hockney’s Wolds and the famous North York Moors, Hardwick House is nestled in the beauty of it all.

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Pickering

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Pickering is an ancient market town in the county of North Yorkshire. The town sits almost at the centre of the Vale of Pickering and is the official gateway to the Yorkshire Moors.

 

It's surrounded by a vast expanse of heather, rolling moorland, mature forests and the beautiful Yorkshire Coast. All of which are territory to many stately homes, ancient churches, wonderful beaches and vast rocky expanses. It offers many popular visitor attractions to entertain holiday makers and day trippers alike, all of which make Pickering a perfect location to visit and from which to explore the locations beyond.

 

Within the boundary you’ll find the Great Yorkshire Forests of Dalby Forest and Cropton Forest. Popular visitor attractions include The North Yorkshire Moors Steam Railway (the longest steam railway in England) and The Beck Isle Museum, with its unique collection of black and white photography and displays of rural life.

 

There are a number of arts exhibitions and special themes held in the town and people come from many parts of the world to take part. They include re-enactments, including the now world famous Wartime Weekend, Steam and Traction Engine Rallies, Craft Fairs, Arts Festivals and Theatres. For the adventurer there is everything from gentle country walks to long distance hiking, plus outstanding forest drives through nature reserves, plus some of Europe's best on and off road cycling routes in Dalby Forest.

 

Pickering is the ideal location for getting away from the hustle and bustle of modern day life.

Whitby

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A  traditional maritime town with old cobbled streets, picturesque houses and sandy blue flag beach, Whitby is not your traditional coastal town. Set among fine stretches of coast with spectacular cliffs, beaches and bays, it has been voted an Enjoy England winner for Best Day Out.

 

Dominated by the cliff-top ruins of the beautiful 13th century Whitby Abbey, with its gaunt, imposing, commanding remains, it has recently been named Britain’s most romantic ruin. Founded in 657 by St Hilda, Whitby Abbey has, over the years, been a bustling settlement, a kings’ burial place, the setting for a historic meeting between Celtic and Roman clerics, the home of saints including the poet Caedmon, and inspiration for Bram Stoker, author of Dracula. Discover how over 2,000 years of history make the Abbey one of England’s most important archaeological sites.

199 steps lead down from the Abbey to the old town where you find yourself in a shoppers’ paradise. With an array of unique shops offering local crafts, famous Whitby Jet jewellery, maritime memorabilia and antiques, you are sure to find that holiday treasure.

 

For food connoisseurs, Whitby has it all. Award winning seafood restaurants, continental delights, traditional sea-shanty inns preparing locally cooked produce and English tea rooms serving freshly baked pastries and Yorkshire teas.

Whitby is a town of endless charm and surprising contrasts.

Scarborough

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Scarborough, Britain’s first seaside resort, has been welcoming visitors for over 360 years and is still as popular as ever.

A place of two halves and two bays - rocky South Bay and award-winning, sandy North Bay - Britain’s original seaside resort is where traditional meets contemporary and where seaside kitsch meets Victorian genteel spa.

 

From the rugged rocky headland and colourful seaside traditions of the South Bay, to the bright beach huts of the award-winning sandy North Bay, Scarborough has all the ingredients you need for a classic beachside break.

 

There’s so much to do in Scarborough. Take a speed boat trip along the harbour, treat the family to a lakeside picnic and feed ducks in the tranquillity of Peasholm Park before watching a re-enacted sea battle in miniature – a charming way to spend an afternoon. Don’t miss the underwater aquatic delights of the Sea Life and Marine Centre, or embrace your cultural side in the Scarborough Art Gallery or the Rotunda Museum– perfect if the weather’s not on your side.

 

Delve below the blissful sandy surface and you’ll find a courageous historical grit that provides Scarborough with a charming character. Scarborough Castle, which towers over the two sweeping bays, offers visitors the chance to explore 3,000 years of turbulent history.

Robin Hood's Bay

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This is Yorkshire's coastline at its most raw and elemental. Here, brooding cliffs tower over a huddle of red roofed former fishing cottages that spill right down to the edge of the sea, creating a ‘lost in time' getaway for anyone who loves unusual architecture and breathtaking scenery.

 

Abandon your car on the cliff top before beginning the twisting descent through this timeless village on foot. On either side of you, picturesque dwellings and cobbled alleyways seem to tumble into each other, right up to the very edge of the coast.

Tucked away in this charming tangle are a cluster of guesthouses, inns and hostels, and enough culinary delights keep the hungriest traveller happy with a fine selection of locally caught fish and Yorkshire cream teas. Be sure to check out the Laurel Inn where the bar is carved out of solid rock!

 

History buffs should head to the local museum and the visitors' centre in the Old Coastguard Station. Or why not explore the huge, unspoilt beach? It's one of the UK's best spots for fossil hunting. The Original Robin Hood's Bay Ghost Walk is a unique Tour that takes you through Streets and Alleyways as you listen to Tales of the Strange and Supernatural set against a background of Smugglers, Shipwrecks, Folklore and Legend.

 

Overlooking the whole bay is Old St Stephen's Church with fascinating souvenirs from the area's many shipwrecks. Head inland into the beautiful Sneaton Forest and its famous Falling Foss Waterfall.

 

For sheer beauty, rugged isolation and unhurried pace of life, few places along Yorkshire's coast, or indeed the UK's, can compare with Robin Hood's Bay.

Goathland

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Goathland is a village deep in the North York Moors, between Pickering and Whitby. It is surrounded by striking, beautiful scenery and has its own station on the North Yorkshire Moors steam railway line.

 

This picturesque village is the setting for the popular television series Heartbeat, and filming may occasionally be seen throughout the year. Goathland became the fictional village of Aidensfield in the series, set in the 1960s. Many landmarks from the series are recognisable, including the stores, garage/funeral directors, the pub and the railway station. The pub is called the Goathland Hotel, but in the series is the Aidensfield Arms.

 

The village itself ages back to Viking times with plenty of its curious history still evident and tame black faced sheep still graze the village commons and nearby moorland.

 

The shops and eateries have a quaint, charming feel that will transport you back in time, while the surrounding countryside will simply take your breath away.

 

Goathland is an ideal base for walkers, cyclists and enthusiasts of nature or steam engines.

Flamingo Land

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Goathland is a village deep in the North York Moors, between Pickering and Whitby. It is surrounded by striking, beautiful scenery and has its own station on the North Yorkshire Moors steam railway line.

 

This picturesque village is the setting for the popular television series Heartbeat, and filming may occasionally be seen throughout the year. Goathland became the fictional village of Aidensfield in the series, set in the 1960s. Many landmarks from the series are recognisable, including the stores, garage/funeral directors, the pub and the railway station. The pub is called the Goathland Hotel, but in the series is the Aidensfield Arms.

 

The village itself ages back to Viking times with plenty of its curious history still evident and tame black faced sheep still graze the village commons and nearby moorland.

 

The shops and eateries have a quaint, charming feel that will transport you back in time, while the surrounding countryside will simply take your breath away.

 

Goathland is an ideal base for walkers, cyclists and enthusiasts of nature or steam engines.

Castle Howard

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One of England’s most beautiful houses, Castle Howard was built in the 18thcentury by Sir John Vanbrugh for the 3rd Earl of Carlisle. The magnificent house sits in a landscape of rolling hills and unexpected monuments.

Visitors discover dramatic interiors containing world-renowned collections, while they listen to friendly and knowledgeable guides share the stories of previous generations.

 

Other exhibitions include ‘Maids and Mistresses: The Women of Castle Howard’ and ‘Artist and Aristocrat: George Howard, 9th Earl of Carlisle a Centenary Exhibition’

 

The award-winning grounds – which feature a walled rose garden, ornamental vegetable garden, and woodland garden – are dotted with statues, temples, lakes and fountains. With seasonal displays, including daffodils, rhododendrons, roses and delphiniums, visitors can learn more about the ground and gardens by joining a free outdoor guided tour.

 

With a great choice of restaurants and cafés, Castle Howard has a menu to suit all tastes and pockets. Choose bistro-style at the Courtyard Café or selfservice at the Fitzroy Room; take away great coffee, cakes, sandwiches and ice-cream at The Boathouse Café and Courtyard Coffee Shop; or top up your picnic with delicious local produce at the Farm Shop.

 

Castle Howard - One of the World's Top Ten Greatest Mansions and Grand Houses.

Dalby Forest

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Dalby Forest is situated on the southern slopes of the North York Moors National Park. The southern part of the forest is divided by a number of valleys creating a 'Rigg and Dale' landscape whilst to the north the forest sits on the upland plateau.

Home to many species of wildlife such as badgers, roe deer and nightjars, there are also many species of trees including oak, beech, ash, alder and hazel.

 

As well as being a world of natural wonder, there are many hiking and mountain bike trails, a 'forest drive' throughout the forest and a 'Go Ape' Outdoor Activity centre. The Dalby Forest visitor centre has a café and shop, and it also offers a selection of other businesses including a bike shop and various craft workshops.

 

A visually stunning and environmentally appealing visit for all ages.

York

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A visit to the regional capital is an absolute must; York has everything for all the family, its history is legendary and this informs the architecture of the place. The Romans made Eboracum a fortress and a majority of the walls exist to this day.

The original pagan temple was destroyed and became the foundation for the city’s pride and joy, the Minster. Before that, of course, the Vikings made York a prime settlement and the this is celebrated in the experiential Yorvik centre and is one of a handful of grisly history venues for you and the family to visit.

 

Prepare yourself for history overload and unwind with a ramble along the famous Shambles and The Stone Bow and Stonegate. York has fabulous shopping and entertainment for your enjoyment; there’s a vast variety of eating places from pizzerrias to classic English tea shops with Betty’s being the world renowned place to relax your feet and enjoy superb pasties and fine teas and coffees.

 

36 miles from Hardwick House is not an overlong journey with beautiful Vale of York and Yorkshire Wolds scenery to take in along the way, the journey is as much a delight as an adventure.

 

York Maze is an incedibly popular destination and will keep the family occupied for many an hour. Close by is the efficient and cost effective Park & Ride which drops you off close to Marks & Spencers. Perfect.

North Yorkshire Moors Railway

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Just 13 miles from Hardwick House is the incredibly romantic and nostalgic steam railway; made famous in a handful of movies with settings along the track providing the backdrop for Harry Potter, Heartbeat and the like.

 

Commencing from Pickering is perfect; you can park up, have a wander, take tea, breakfast or lunch and then make your way to the station. The architecture, sights and smells will transport you into childhood as you wait to board the classic railway.

 

You will begin to anticipate the thrill of the steam and amazing views and sights along the way from Pickering to Grosmont and beyond to gothic Whitby. The train journey will whisk you through the depths of North York Moors National Park and you will enjoy stops along the way at picturesque Levisham, Newton Dale Halt and Goathland.

 

True romantics will enjoy the Pulman Diner experience and booking is highly recommended – there’s a choice of three service levels all backed up by a top quality catering team for your delight and enjoyment – only in Yorkshire!

Helmsley

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Just 26 miles due west is the beautiful market town of Helmlsey, one of the true delights of Ryedale. In true Yorkshire fashion, this busy town will not disappoint. The architecture, ambience and landscape is classic Yorkshire with the moors to the north and Vale of Pickering to the south.

 

Helmsley has fantastic art spaces for theatre, film, dance and exhibition along with super accommodation and a mass of cultural sites to pay a visit to. Check out the five acre, Helmsley Walled Garden now being lovingly restored to its original grandeur. History fans can immerse themselves in Helmsley Archive with over 5000 images to view.

 

No matter what you are looking for, Helmsley is the perfect stop-off with plenty of top notch places to eat lunch, tea or dinner and coupled with true Yorkshire pride, this market town will repay your visit in spades.